The stories of the island

The prison

In 1825 a state prison was constructed on Frederiksø – the first of its kind in Denmark. The prison remained in service until 1856.

The castle

Nestled atop a cliff above Borre in Almindingen, lie the ruins of Lilleborg – the oldest royal castle in the Nordics, dating from the 1100s.

The granite

Bornholm’s foundations are made up of some of the world’s oldest granite, dating back to volcanic activity some 2.000 million years ago.

The flag

The (unofficial) flag of Bornholm was designed in the 1970s by Bent Kaas. Staying true to the Nordic convention it sports a cross – in this case, a green one.

The ruins

Hammershus is the second oldest complex of ruins north of the Alps, dating back to the 1200s. It contains several well preserved constructions.

The Naval Base

In 1684 King Christian V founded the fortress Christiansø, which remained into operation until 1855. The base played a key role in curtailing Swedish naval power.

The flag goddess

TBornholm has revealed the only ancient depiction of the mythical water goddess Slattenlangpat – an elvish goddess of fertility – in the shape of a golde figurine.

The name

The island’s name is mentioned in ancient texts as land of the Burgundars, which has led some to connect it to Burgundy in France. More likely, it’s a reference to a castle on a hill.

The Chapel

Legend has it that an Irish munk called Jon arrived at Bornholm in order to christianise the island. In stead of a church he used the natural cave now called Jon’s Chapel.

The Echo

Ekkoldalen (Valley of Echoes) is a gorge that has drawn visitors for centuries due the its natural echo producing abilities.

The stories of the island

The prison

In 1825 a state prison was constructed on Frederiksø – the first of its kind in Denmark. The prison remained in service until 1856.

The castle

Nestled atop a cliff above Borre in Almindingen, lie the ruins of Lilleborg – the oldest royal castle in the Nordics, dating from the 1100s.

The granite

Bornholm’s foundations are made up of some of the world’s oldest granite, dating back to volcanic activity some 2.000 million years ago.

The flag

The (unofficial) flag of Bornholm was designed in the 1970s by Bent Kaas. Staying true to the Nordic convention it sports a cross – in this case, a green one.

The ruins

Hammershus is the second oldest complex of ruins north of the Alps, dating back to the 1200s. It contains several well preserved constructions.

The Naval Base

In 1684 King Christian V founded the fortress Christiansø, which remained into operation until 1855. The base played a key role in curtailing Swedish naval power.

The flag goddess

TBornholm has revealed the only ancient depiction of the mythical water goddess Slattenlangpat – an elvish goddess of fertility – in the shape of a golde figurine.

The name

The island’s name is mentioned in ancient texts as land of the Burgundars, which has led some to connect it to Burgundy in France. More likely, it’s a reference to a castle on a hill.

The Chapel

Legend has it that an Irish munk called Jon arrived at Bornholm in order to christianise the island. In stead of a church he used the natural cave now called Jon’s Chapel.

The Echo

Ekkoldalen (Valley of Echoes) is a gorge that has drawn visitors for centuries due the its natural echo producing abilities.